top of page

IMMIGRATION

Spouse, Children, Employee.

HELPING CLIENTS THROUGH THE PROCESS

Immigration can be an overwhelming and stressful process. I know this personally, having gone through the immigration process with my wife. 

 

Proper planning and preparation are very important in getting through this process. I will handle everything for you -- filing all necessary paperwork, accompanying you at any interviews including overseas consulate processing, and preparing documentation to support your case. 

I have compiled some useful links below to help you in understanding what the process entails. If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me for a free consultation.

Contact for Free Consultation

Family of a U.S. Citizen

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is the governmental agency that oversees lawful immigration to the United States. The USCIS grants certain "immigration benefits" to family members of U.S. citizens including a Green Card (Permanent Resident) and specific immigrant visas. 

There are very specific rules and requirements for each of the following cases. It is extremely important to follow the requirements of USCIS.

 

The following information is meant for reference only

Green Card (Permanent Resident)

A U.S. citizen may petition USCIS to issue a Green Card (Permanent Residence) for certain family members including a Spouse, Child, Parent, or Siblings. There are different requirements depending on where the family member is located and it is extremely important to have help in properly filing these cases.

Fiancé(e) Visa

A U.S. citizen may petition USCIS to issue a Fiancé(e) Visa for a fiance residing outside of the United States and children of the Fiancé(e) that are under 21 years of age. The Fiancé(e) visa allows a fiance of a U.S. citizen to lawfully enter the United States for the purpose of marriage and the couple must get married in the United States within 90 days of the arrival of the Fiancé(e). Once the Fiancé(e) and U.S. citizen are married, the U.S. citzen must petition for the issuance of a Green Card (Permanent Residence) and the Fiancé(e) must generally remain inside the country during this time. 

K3/K4 Nonimmigrant Visa

A U.S. citzen may petition USCIS to issue a K3/K4 Nonimmigrant Visa for a spouse or child that resides outside the United States while they are awaiting a petition for Green Card (Permanent Resident) petition. Depending on the country that the spouse and/or child resides, the wait time for a Green Card petition can be long. During this time it can be very difficult if not impossible to visit the United States as the spouse has already indicated the intent to immigrate to the United States. The K3/K4 allows your spouse to enter the United States lawfully during the time that the Green Card petition is processed. 

Temporary Nonimmigrant Workers

In order to lawfully work in the united states as a temporary nonimmigrant worker, generally an employer in the United States must file a nonimmigrant petition on behalf of the temporary foreign worker. However, there are some instances where a temporary nonimmigrant worker does not need an employer to file a petition.  There are various classifications of temporary nonimmigrant workers each requiring specific filing requirements. A seperate filing can be made in regards to a spouse or child of a temporary nonimmigrant worker. The requirements for filing a petition for a spouse or child of a temporary nonimmigrant worker depends on whether the spouse and/or child is currently inside or outside the United States. 

Permanent Workers -- Green Card (Permanent Resident)

The number of immigrant visas available to those seeking to be a permanent worker in the United States (and their spouses and children) are limited each year. It is extremely important to prepare for filing a petition so as to not miss out on the available visas issued by USCIS. There are five employment-based immigrant visas categories each having specific requirements for eligibility. Each visa carries a preference, indicating the order in which individuals will be selected out of the available total to be issued by USCIS. 

Students and Exchange Visitor Work Authorization

Generally, a nonimmigrant that is currently in the United States under a student or exchange visa is not legally authorized to work in the United States. However, students and exchange vistors may under certain circumstances be granted authorization to lawfully work in the United States during their temporary stay. The student or exchange vistor must get permission from an authorized official at their school. The authorized official at a school for those currently in the United States under a student visa is known as a Designed School Official (DSO) and the authorized official for those currently in the United States as a exchange visitor is known as a Responsible Officer (RO). 

Temporary Visitors for Business (B1 Visa)

A person that wishes to travel to the United States for the purpose of business must first obtain a B1 temporary visa for busine. If you qualify for admission to the United States without a visa under the Visa Waiver Program, then a B1 visa is not required. 

Immigration of Employee's

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is the governmental agency that oversees lawful immigration to the United States. The USCIS grants certain "immigration benefits" to family members of U.S. citizens including a Green Card (Permanent Resident) and specific immigrant visas. 

There are very specific rules and requirements for each of the following cases. It is extremely important to follow the requirements of USCIS.

 

The following information is meant for reference only

bottom of page